Social Solidarity

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Part of the Politics series on
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Parties

Christian Democratic parties
Christian Democrat International
European People's Party
European Democratic Party
Euro Christian Political Movement
Christian Dem Org of America

Ideas

Social conservatism
Social market economy
Human dignity · Personalism
Freedom · Justice · Solidarity
Sphere sovereignty · Subsidiarity
Communitarianism · Federalism
Stewardship · Sustainability


Catholic social teaching
Neo-Calvinism · Neo-Thomism

Important Documents

Rerum Novarum (1891)
Stone Lectures (Princeton 1898)
Graves de Communi Re (1901)
Quadragesimo Anno (1931)
Laborem Exercens (1981)
Sollicitudi Rei Socialis (1987)
Centesimus Annus (1991)

Important Figures

Thomas Aquinas · John Calvin
Pope Leo XIII · Abraham Kuyper
Maritain · Adenauer · De Gasperi
Pope Pius XI · Schuman
Pope John Paul II · Kohl

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Social Solidarity is the degree or type (see below) of integration of a society. This use of the term is generally employed in sociology and the other social sciences.

The types of social solidarity are generally understood to correlate with types of society. In simpler societies (e.g., tribal), solidarity is usually based on kinship[mechanical solidarity] ties or familial networks. In more complex societies (e.g., democracies), solidarity is more organic. Organic here is referring to the interdependence of the component parts. Thus, social solidarity is maintained in more complex societies through the interdependence of its component parts (e.g., farmers produce the food to feed the factory workers who produce the tractors that allow the farmer to produce the food). For more information on these two types of social solidarity, see social disintegration.

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Social Solidarity

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