Politics of Qatar

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Politics of Qatar takes place in a framework of an absolute monarchy whereby the Emir of Qatar is not only head of state, but also the head of government.

Contents

[edit] Executive branch

Main office holders
Office Name Party Since
Emir Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani since 27 June 1995
Prime Minister Abdullah bin Khalifah Al Thani 30 October 1996

In Qatar, the ruling Al Thani (الثاني) family continued to hold power following the declaration of independence in 1971. The head of state is the Emir, and the right to rule Qatar is passed on within the Al Thani family. Politically, Qatar is evolving from a traditional society into a modern welfare state. Government departments have been established to meet the requirements of social and economic progress. The Basic Law of Qatar 1970 institutionalized local customs rooted in Qatar's conservative Wahhabi heritage, granting the Emir preeminent power. The Emir's role is influenced by continuing traditions of consultation, rule by consensus, and the citizen's right to appeal personally to the Emir. The Emir, while directly accountable to no one, cannot violate the Shari’a (Islamic law) and, in practice, must consider the opinions of leading notables and the religious establishment. Their position was institutionalized in the Advisory Council, an appointed body that assists the Emir in formulating policy. There is no electoral system. Political parties are banned.

The influx of expatriate Arabs has introduced ideas that call into question the tenets of Qatar's traditional society, but there has been no serious challenge to Al Thani rule.

In February 1972, the Deputy Ruler and Prime Minister, Sheikh Khalifa bin Hamad, deposed his cousin, Emir Ahmad, and assumed power. This move was supported by the key members of Al Thani and took place without violence or signs of political unrest.

On June 27, 1995, the Deputy Ruler, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa, deposed his father Emir Khalifa in a bloodless coup. Emir Hamad and his father reconciled in 1996. Increased freedom of the press followed, and the Qatar-based Al Jazeera television channel (founded late 1996) is widely regarded as the only example of free and uncensored source of news in Arab countries.

[edit] Consultative Assembly

The Consultative Assembly (Majlis as-Shura) has 35 appointed members with only consultative tasks.

[discuss] – [edit]
Composition of the Consultative Assembly of Qatar
Members Seats
Appointed members 35
Total 35

[edit] Political parties and elections

Qatar is developing into a constitutional monarchy, but it doesn't allow political parties and doesn't hold elections on a national level. Suffrage is currently limited to municipal elections (for both males and females aged 18 years or more). Expatriate residents are excluded. The elected Municipal Council has no executive powers but may offer advice to the Minister.
The State is gradually increasing popular participation in public affairs. The draft constitution envisages a partially elected Advisory Council, to review legislation and advise the Amir.

[edit] Legal system

Qatar has a discretionary system of law controlled by the emir, although civil codes are being implemented; Islamic law is significant in personal matters.

[edit] Human rights

To Western eyes, the Qatari authorities seem to keep a relatively tight rein on freedom of expression and moves for equality; but when compared to neighbors like Saudi Arabia, Qatar boasts one of the best standards-of-living and quality-of-life in its region.

Freedom in the World 2006 lists Qatar as "Not Free", and on a 1-7 scale (1 being the most "free") rates the country a 6 for political rights and 5 for civil liberties.

[edit] Administrative divisions

9 municipalities (baladiyat, singular - baladiyah); Ad Dawhah, Al Ghuwayriyah, Al Jumayliyah, Al Khawr, Al Wakrah, Ar Rayyan, Jarayan al Batinah, Madinat ash Shamal, Umm Salal

[edit] Foreign relations

According to BBC, in April 2006 Qatar announced that it will give $50m USD (£ 28m) to the new Hamas-led Palestinian government. Many western countries have cut off financial support to the Palestinian Authority since its election of a Hamas led government.

In May 2006, Qatar pledged more than $100 million to Hurricane Katrina relief to colleges and universities in Louisiana affected by the hurricane.

Qatar is member of ABEDA, AFESD, AL, AMF, ESCWA, FAO, G-77, GCC, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICRM, IDB, IFAD, IFRCS, IHO (pending member), ILO, IMF, International Maritime Organization, Inmarsat, Intelsat, Interpol, IOC, ISO (correspondent), ITU, NAM, OAPEC, OIC, OPCW, OPEC, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, UPU, WCO, WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTrO, WTO

On October 10, 2005, for the first time, Qatar was elected to a two-year term on the UN Security Council for 2006-2007.

[edit] External links

Politics of Qatar

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