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Kennington

Kennington

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Kennington
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Location
OS grid reference:TQ305775
Latitude: 51.481333488682125°
Longitude: -0.11973395935084286°
Administration
London borough: Lambeth
County level: Greater London
Region: London
Constituent country:England
Sovereign state:United Kingdom
Other
Ceremonial county: Greater London
Historic county: Surrey (1889)
Services
Police force: Metropolitan Police
Fire brigade: London Fire Brigade
Ambulance service: London Ambulance
Post office and telephone
Post town: LONDON
Postal district: SE11
Dialling code:020
Politics
UK Parliament: Vauxhall (UK Parliament constituency)
London Assembly: Lambeth and Southwark
European Parliament: London
London | List of places in London

Kennington is an area of south London, situated within the London Borough of Lambeth. It is a largely working class residential suburb, and is the location of the The Oval, the well-known cricket stadium.

Edward III gave the manor of Kennington to his oldest son Edward "the Black Prince" in 1337, and the prince then built a large royal palace between what is now Black Prince Road and Sancroft Street. Geoffrey Chaucer was employed at Kennington as Clerk of Works in 1389. He was paid 2 shillings. This area of Kennington continues to be owned by monarch's elder sons (Princes of Wales and Dukes of Cornwall ) to the present day.

Kennington Park (laid out by Victorian architect James Pennethorne) and St Mark's Churchyard now cover the site of Kennington Common. In 1746 the Surrey County Gallows at the southern end of the common was used for the execution of nine leaders of the Jacobite rebellion of 1745. The Common was also where the Chartists gathered for their biggest demonstration in 1848.

(Fuller details of the Common's history are in the Kennington Park article.)

Kennington Park Road and Clapham Road is a long and straight stretch of road because it follows the old Roman Stane Street. This ran down from the Roman London Bridge to Chichester via the gap in the North Downs at Box Hill near Dorking. Another Roman road branched off opposite Kennington Road and went down through what is now Kennington Park and down the Brixton Road. It carried on through the North Downs near Caterham to Hassocks, just north of the South Downs.

Nearest places:

Nearest tube stations:

[edit] External links

Kennington

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