Demographics of the Netherlands

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Demographics of the Netherlands

Image:Netherlands-demography.png
Historical demographics of the Netherlands, Data of FAO, year 2005; Number of inhabitants in thousands.
Dutch population pyramid
(in % of total population)
% Male Age Female %
0.36
 
85+
 
1.05
0.60
 
80-84
 
1.18
1.14
 
75-79
 
1.74
1.55
 
70-74
 
1.95
1.93
 
65-69
 
2.13
2.30
 
60-64
 
2.33
2.77
 
55-59
 
2.69
3.73
 
50-54
 
3.60
3.65
 
45-49
 
3.54
3.93
 
40-44
 
3.81
4.27
 
35-39
 
4.08
4.25
 
30-34
 
4.05
3.63
 
25-29
 
3.54
3.04
 
20-24
 
2.93
2.96
 
15-19
 
2.83
3.11
 
10-14
 
2.97
3.20
 
05-09
 
3.06
3.11
 
00-04
 
2.98
Data: International Data Base (2000)

Population: 16,318,199 (July 2004 est.)

On an area of 41,526 km² this means a population density of 393/km² per km² (rank), or 482/km² if only the land area, 33,883 km², is counted.

Age structure:
0-14 years: 18% (male 1,497,290; female 1,431,671)
15-64 years: 68% (male 5,490,518; female 5,305,848)
65 years and over: 14% (male 885,839; female 1,281,071) (2000 est.)

Population growth rate: 0.57% (2004 est.) = 93,000/yr = 255/day

Birth rate: 11.41 births/1,000 population (2004 est.)

Death rate: 8.67 deaths/1,000 population (2004 est.)

Net migration rate: 2.91 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2004 est.)

Sex ratio:
at birth: 1.05 male(s)/female
under 15 years: 1.05 male(s)/female
15-64 years: 1.03 male(s)/female
65 years and over: 0.69 male(s)/female
total population: 0.98 male(s)/female (2000 est.)

Infant mortality rate: 4.42 deaths/1,000 live births (2000 est.)

Life expectancy at birth:
total population: 78.28 years
male: 75.4 years
female: 81.28 years (2000 est.)

Total fertility rate: 1.64 children born/woman (2000 est.)

Nationality:
noun: Dutchman(men), Dutchwoman(women)
adjective: Dutch

Ethnic groups: Dutch 80.9%, Indonesians, Germans, Surinamese, Moroccans, Turks and others 19.1% (2006 est.)

Religions: Roman Catholic 31%, Protestant 21%, Muslim 6.1% (See Islam in the Netherlands), Hinduism 1.5%, other 3.6%, not religious 40% (1998)

Languages: Dutch, Frisian
Regional languages: Low German, Limburgish

Literacy:
definition: age 15 and over can read and write
total population: 99% (1979 est.)
male: NA%
female: NA%

Contents

[edit] Population of foreign origin

As of January 2005, some 3.1 million inhabitants of the Netherlands, accounting for 19% of the population, were considered being of foreign origin. Among these foreigners, five groups had a population of 300,000+: Indonesians / former citizens of the Dutch Indies (396,000 - 2.43%), Germans (386,000 - 2.37%), Turks (358,000 - 2.20%), Surinamese (328,000 - 2.02%) and Moroccans (315,000 - 1.93%). Other large etnicities were citizens of the Netherlands Antilles / Aruba, Belgians, British, ex-Yugoslavians and Chinese.

Of the 3.1 million people of foreign origin, some 1.7 million are considered to be of non-Western origin, while some 1.4 million are considered to be of Western origin (included in the latter category are people from Indonesia / the former Dutch Indies, as well as from Japan).

An overview (January 2005):

[edit] Population density comparisons

The Netherlands is one of the most densely populated countries in the world: only Bangladesh and South Korea are larger and more densely populated (hence have a larger population), and only Taiwan is smaller and has a larger population (hence a larger population density). There are 21 more countries (12 independent ones and 9 dependent territories) with a larger population density, but they all have a smaller population (hence a smaller area). If the water area is not counted then Taiwan is larger, and there are 16 more countries (9 independent ones and 7 dependent territories) with a larger population density.

Not counting dependent territories, 50 countries are smaller and less densely populated (hence have a smaller population), 73 countries are larger and have a smaller population (hence a smaller population density), and 55 countries with a smaller population density, but a larger population (hence a larger area).

(See also List of countries by population density, which includes dependent territories as separate entries, and List of countries by population, which shows to which countries they belong)

Considering also subdivisions of countries, also the PRC provinces Jiangsu, Shandong and Henan [1] and the Indonesian provinces Jawa Barat, Jawa Tengah and Jawa Timur [2] are larger and more densely populated (hence have a larger population), and Shanghai Municipality is smaller and has a larger population (hence a larger population density).

Also several states of India fall into one of these two categories, including Bihar, Haryana, Punjab, Uttar Pradesh, and West Bengal (all in the north) [3].

[edit] Demographic outlook

According to new statistics by the CBS (Dutch Census Bureau), released at February 10th 2006, 2005 saw the lowest absolute population growth since 1900. The Dutch population grew with 30,000 persons to 16,340,000 as of January 1st 2006.

Dutch demographics are marked by a below maintenance level birthrate, growing deathrates (due to a growing elderly population), and a far larger emigration than immigration. In 2005, 121,000 Dutch emigrated, mostly to the neighboring countries Belgium, Germany and the United Kingdom and to the Netherlands Antilles. About half of the emigrants were ethnic Dutch; the other half are both Western and non-Western foreigners returning to their country of birth, or rejected asylum seekers (whose numbers have grown with the enforcement of stricter immigration rules the last couple of years).

In 2005, a total of 94,000 immigrants entered the Netherlands, marking a 27,000 difference in favor of emigration. Immigration patterns are increasingly changing; while Turkish and Moroccan immigrants were making up the largest segment of immigrants in the 1990s, their share has dropped to only several hundreds in 2005. The share of Eastern European immigrants has however risen sharply after the admittance of several Eastern European countries to the European Union in May 2004. The number of Polish immigrants, for example, has risen from 2,000 in 2004 to 7,000 in 2005, and is expected to grow further the coming years. A large number of immigrants are Dutch emigrants returning home.

For a country which has seen large immigration waves since the 1960s, another trend has been set with growing emigration, similar to the emigration wave in the 1950s, when some 560,000 Dutchmen emigrated to mostly Anglo-Saxon countries (Canada, Australia, the United States, South Africa, New Zealand), leaving their war-torn and overpopulated home country behind.

In 2005, 188,000 children were born in the Netherlands, a decrease of 6,000 with 2004. 2005 recorded 137,000 deaths.

The Netherlands has the youngest population in Europe after Ireland. It is expected that in the future, the Netherlands will see a further greyening of the population, but the impact of this will be felt later and less severe than in neighbouring countries.

[edit] See also

[edit] External links


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